Homos!!

By absentee Posted in Comments (118) / Email this page » / Leave a comment »

This may be one of those throwaway blog entries, I'm afraid. As I no longer maintain my own blog, I am posting this here.

Their is a malady, a contagious infection if you will, that is making the rounds hear at Redstate. In fact, not just hear, but in the news tickers on cable news networks, in advertising, and even in newspaper headlines. As you've surely surmised, I'm talking, of course, about homophones. Specifically, I'm talking about using the wrong one from a group of them. I've been doing so throughout this paragraph. (I'm going to try to stop now, as it is tiresome.)

I do want to point out that I am not complaining in general about spelling errors. Everyone makes spelling errors now and then; everyone makes typos. Most of us make errors in our grammar or usage now and then as well. This is different, and in my opinion, far more annoying.

Let me give you one of the most frequently seen examples: Marshall Law. How many times have you seen this absurdity? I've seen it in the news, I've seen it in fake news in TV movies, and I've seen it in blogs. It is MARTIAL law! As in "temporary rule by military authorities, imposed on a civilian population especially in time of war or when civil authority has broken down."

Here's another particularly annoying example: their. Where has the word their got off to? It is written as there or they're by bloggers so frequently, they're going to change their understanding of the three until there is no difference.

If you say "due too" or "dew to" then you are making an error. If you say that something "had an affect" on you, that you hope to "affect change" or wonder how that change "may effect" you, then you are making a mistake; a mistake that your spell-checker won't find and won't correct.

This malady does, of course, have its humorous side. Sometimes homophone misuse results in a malapropism (I am not quite so modern yet as to subscribe to the notion that mere misuse of a word rises to the level of malapropism. I remain an advocate of the definition that requires misuse of a word in a common phrase). If you live "next store" to someone, if you classify something as "beyond the pail," perhaps because it violates the "tenants" of your philosophy, then you're familiar with the phenomenon. Do you ever find yourself "batting down the hatches" or waiting for something to "bare fruit"? Do you fret over someone being given "free reign"? If so, you may suffer from this illness.

I would love to see some funny examples posted here by reply. I don't expect this blog entry to be a cure. Maybe, however, it can serve as treatment. I think it would be nice to see Redstate stand out positively in this regard.

Of coarse, it could be that I'm simply to picky and critical. If so, I'm sure I'll get my just desserts.*



Some sites I obtained information from are:
eggcorns.lascribe.net; webgrammar.com; answers.com.

*That's right, "just desserts" is wrong.

HTML Help Central for Red Staters
Reality: Thompson/Romney Dream: Santorum/Watts.

Less than 100 people showed up, so I had to open a can of whoop ***.

Great discussion!


...when they see me they'll say, "There goes Loren Wallace,
the greatest thing to ever climb into a race car."

Of coarse, it could be that I'm simply to picky and critical. If so, I'm sure I'll get my just desserts.*

but I could care less about passing judgement.

Well that just begs the question: Why did you comment then?

HTML Help Central for Red Staters
Reality: Thompson/Romney Dream: Santorum/Watts.

you miscornstrued what I said as bieng a comment.

We both butchered an expression :-)

HTML Help Central for Red Staters
Reality: Thompson/Romney Dream: Santorum/Watts.

...but that one just kills me. Maybe it's because I was a philosophy major.

Woody Allen had some great line about Kant training his dog to beg the question.

That must have been a tough road to hoe. Hopefully Kant took the right tact, and the dog towed the line.

"I should be allowed to think" -- John Linnell

I still could care less.

you do care because he's right...

This is an historic moment...

"I Will Always Place The Mission First.
"I will never accept defeat.
"I will never quit.
"I will never leave a fallen comrade."
Warrior Ethos, US Army

my fourth grade teacher use the phrase, "I couldn't care less", way back in 1958.

Since then the proper use of the phrase has diminished to the point where it is not heard that often.

My use of "irregardless" and "I could care less" and the various misspellings, were meant in jest.

"I Will Always Place The Mission First.
"I will never accept defeat.
"I will never quit.
"I will never leave a fallen comrade."
Warrior Ethos, US Army

I admit, you had me going at first. In fact, that first sentence grated on my eyeballs so much, I almost stopped reading!

right David? :-)


...when they see me they'll say, "There goes Loren Wallace,
the greatest thing to ever climb into a race car."

I was twitching.

"And today the great Yertle, that Marvelous he, Is King of the Mud. That is all he can see. And the turtles, of course... all the turtles are free As turtles and, maybe, all creatures should be." --Dr. Seuss

Mike Gamecock DeVine @ The Charlotte Observer
www.race42008.com
www.hinzsightreport.com
www.theminorityreportblog.com
"One man with courage makes a majority" - Andrew Jackson

Mike Gamecock DeVine @ The Charlotte Observer
www.race42008.com
www.hinzsightreport.com
www.theminorityreportblog.com
"One man with courage makes a majority" - Andrew Jackson

here, here, and here.


...when they see me they'll say, "There goes Loren Wallace,
the greatest thing to ever climb into a race car."

...it'd be funny if enough people recommended this for it to hit the top of the recommended diaries. Especially if it triggered kneejerk hasty diaries on Certain Other Sites That Could Care Less About Us... ;)

The Fuzzy Puppy of the VRWC. I've been usurped!

"No compromise with the main purpose, no peace till victory, no pact with unrepentant wrong." - Winston Churchill

____
CongressCritter™: Never have so few felt like they were owed so much by so many for so little.

Altho it was harde to find the 'Recomind' button....

It's war -- so when can we start shooting back at the enemy Democrats?

...the point of this diary will be completely lost on them.

It's such a fine line between stupid and clever. - David St. Hubbins

OK, I'm serious for a moment. This one FROSTS me, and I don't know why, unless it's that I perhaps have anger issues:

........as good or better than......
........as tall or taller than......
........as long or longer than......

To which I reply AS DUMB AS OR DUMBER THAN!

I don't really mind seeing this in blog-world, but I see this in print (books, newspapers, reputable magazines and periodicals)

Oh, I hate it.....

It's war -- so when can we start shooting back at the enemy Democrats?

Sometimes they really do get under your skin. The martial law one drive me nuts!
absentee


absentee

to keep people from getting divorces.
____
CongressCritter™: Never have so few felt like they were owed so much by so many for so little.

. . . could be an appropriately named US Marshall. You know, like Cardinal Sin . . . oh, I haven't opened that thread have I?

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

..but your right: Every body owes it too theirself to speak clearly when they conversate. Failing to do so is an indice of a lack of intellect.

Hopefully, this can stay between you and I.

It's such a fine line between stupid and clever. - David St. Hubbins

is then/than.

In almost 50 years of living I had never seen the two confused until I began reading blogs. Now I see it almost every day.

I wonder if it's a regional thing. In the deep south the two words sound very different.

win blogs like this hit the top of the list.

I think are standards are dropping.

--
Gone 2500 years, still not PC.

It's war -- so when can we start shooting back at the enemy Democrats?

and I take acception to it.

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

Years ago I was chatting to (well, up) a young lady online and after a while I noticed that she made a number of odd grammatical errors. Internet chat can be like that. It is very informal and people don't pay attention to what they write. But these were not typical errors of the semi-educated. She would occasionally use odd tense structures but never made homophone errors. I began to wonder if English was not her native language, so I asked if she spoke any other languages. It turned out her first language was American Sign Language - she could neither speak nor hear. ASL is modelled on English, but has a simplified tense structure, hence her occasional errors when typing quickly. But, of course, she was incapable of making homophone errors. Her brain didn't categorise words that way. Why would she confuse a word indicating proximity with a word for a sense she didn't have?

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

It's war -- so when can we start shooting back at the enemy Democrats?

or that your all anti-Semiotic?

soli Deo gloria

It's war -- so when can we start shooting back at the enemy Democrats?

------------
This kind of liberty is, indeed, but another name for justice; ascertained by wise laws, and secured by well-constructed institutions.

-Edmund Burke

------------
This kind of liberty is, indeed, but another name for justice; ascertained by wise laws, and secured by well-constructed institutions.

-Edmund Burke

I'm so glad you brought this up, because running into an inadvertent homophone in the middle of an otherwise serious story is the cognitive equivalent of being a passenger on a motorcycle when the breaks fail at the intersection of Mayhem and Chaos. You were just along for the ride and now, instantly, you're recked.

Its one of those things that greats at me like something I can't bare, aisle tell you.

I hate reading a great post, and thinking "Man, this is a grate post!" when suddenly their will be a homophone. I positively whence when that happens.

--
Gone 2500 years, still not PC.

All seriousness aside, I think it's caused by trying to right without having red very much.

Drink Good Coffee. You can sleep when you're dead.

Desert, dessert and desert.

So, 'desert' as in 'just deserts' is a homophone of 'dessert' as in cheesecake - ie they sound the same but don't look the same.

It is a homonym of 'desert' as in 'deserters will be shot on sight (and indeed on site)' - ie they sound and look the same.

But is there a word for its relationship with 'desert' as in Sahara and Gobi - where they look the same but sound different?

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

They are homographs: same spelling, different meaning. The sound is irrelevant, which means that your 2nd example is also more explicitly a homograph than a homonym; actually all 3 of your examples are homonyms, which merely pairs the same sound OR spelling with a different meaning.

"Homonuh-homonuh-homonuh..." (Ralph Kramden)

soli Deo gloria

"Are you making in front of me?"
(are you making fun of me?)

"Everyone has a ladder becept me!"

"What am I opposed to do?

"You never need a firearm,until you need it BADLY!"

How about supposably? I hate that one!
absentee

I thawt all this bad grammer was outlauted in the Democrat Minimum Wage Bill? Wasn't their a related eermark?

Personal peeve hear in NY; using "are" in place of "our". Listen to any newscast, you will never be the same again!

I am thru.

"Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori"
Contributor to The Minority Report

... it's usually the result of typing too fast, not because I would have used the wrong word upon reflection.

BTW, what is "free reign" supposed to be?

--
We would also like to know your advice for somebody like my daughter, who's going to graduate in two years, advice that you would give a young person.

SEC. RUMSFELD: Advice for a young person. Study history.

It's some kind of chicken.

Drink Good Coffee. You can sleep when you're dead.

I'm trying to better myself here!!!

--
We would also like to know your advice for somebody like my daughter, who's going to graduate in two years, advice that you would give a young person.

SEC. RUMSFELD: Advice for a young person. Study history.

The farther back you pull on the ropes, the more the horse stops. Slack the ropes, and the horse can go faster. If the horse wants to, that is. Horses aren't what you'd call energetic thinkers.

The Fuzzy Puppy of the VRWC. I've been usurped!

I thought we our opposed to handouts.

"No compromise with the main purpose, no peace till victory, no pact with unrepentant wrong." - Winston Churchill

Because free reign would also be logical, it is pretty common. The phrase "free reign" therefore, qualifies on three counts: switching a word with its homophone; as a malapropism; and as an "eggcorn".
absentee

I thought it was calvary jargon;)

"free rein" not "free reign," and Moe is right, at least to a degree. A synonomous phrase in the equestrian world would be to "give the horse his head." The reins are used to put pressure on a bit in a horse's mouth and that pressure communicates to the horse the rider's desire to go left or right and sharply to go as well as to stop or go, though relaxing the reins and spurring or kicking the horse is usually the way a horse is told to go. Many horses are trained to do all these things and more from oral commands or just pressure from the rider's knees.

Anyway, when one is said to have free rein, it means they are under no outside control just as a horse would be if the rider relaxed or dropped the reins.

And God am I glad I don't have or have to know about horses anymore!

In Vino Veritas

about horses is that they eat while you sleep. Bring your Czech book.

Envisioning when all that is Left is the Right.

...with a saddle bag? ;)

The perils of replying to the last comment in a thread.

As a kid growing up on a farm in Georgia, we still had draught horses and mules and kept them for tobacco cultivation even long after we'd gone to tractors for everything else. I spent a good bit of my young life tending those beasts and when I got big enough, working them. So, I can say I've had bad experiences with almost every aspect of horses and mules. They're stupid, they bite, they kick, they try to crush you against walls and fences, they eat expensive food, they cause good money to be given to vets instead of to me. The North end of a Southbound mule is a hard, hot, dirty, stinky place! I can go on a while.

In Vino Veritas

and he just cringes whenever someone calls and says that they have a team of mules to shoe. He finally called most of his mule customers and told them he wasn't going to do it anymore. Got tired of the beasts trying to kill him while he was trying to help them. He found that, in general, those who had good owners who believed in discipline and lots of training had good animals. Those who were scared of their own animals--and there were many--had really psychotic beasts. But even the good mules were huge and difficult to handle. When my husband was a boy on a working farm here in TN., his dad had a mule that they used for plowing the fields for tobacco and corn. Come 5:00 every day, the mule quit work and headed for the barn. You could set your watch by him.

Come 5:00 every day, the mule quit work and headed for the barn. You could set your watch by him.

Amalgamated Union of Infertile Equine Field Operatives and Allied Trades?

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

Dems, I wouldn't be surprised. As is usually the case, however, they didn't appreciate union mules applying their own beliefs when it didn't suit them.

of what I surmise to be your husband's folk's age who WASN'T a "lifelong dem." I was born a Baptist and a Democrat! Fortunately, learning to read got me over the Baptist part, at least the kind that was practiced in the rural South in the fifties and sixties. It took getting out of The South and about 20 semesters of Life 101 to get over the Democrat part.

In Vino Veritas

Georgia to being an Alaskan Republican of whatever denomination. Were you by any chance in the Witness Protection program? Because, trust me, you'll never be found with THAT big a change in your stats! By the way, miss those loooong hot, humid Georgia summers? I wouldn't either.

nothing bothers me more than people these days who have managed to "loose" the ability to use proper words and spell correctly.

I guess we all minus well get used to it. (Yes, I've actually seen people use "minus well." Scary.)

That is hilarious!
absentee

for correctly completing a subtraction problem. That's not true, but this is: when I was a senior in high-school I got a recruitment letter from the Air Force Academy which instructed me to "try and" or "be sure and" or something along those lines...can't remember exactly "witch" of those problems it was since it has been nine or ten years now.

Oh, just a question for the masters of English here - is it appropriate to use "it's" for both "it is" and "it has"?

"Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
Ronald Reagan

But doesn't everyone find could of, should of and would of utterly infuriating?

Or is it only British people that do that?

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

... and no, it isn't only British people making that error. I see it online frequently, and I hear it spoken in person. It's terribly annoying.

absentee

I assume they are saying should've.

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

Maybe in certain accents there is reason for charity, but in many cases the uhv sound of of (sounds like love or glove) should be distinctly different from the Əv sound of the contraction (the schwa being the same sound as the i in pencil or [often] the middle o in eloquent [although sometimes that is pronounced with the long o like in hobo]).

Again, perhaps I'm being picky.

absentee

of doesn't rhyme with love or glove.

And by the way, that is just English. You're the one with the accent. :)

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

Don't get me wrong, I agree. I call myself absentee because I am so frequently away. I work with a number of Brits and we have the discussion about English frequently. There are some on that side of the pond who think American English is, in some instances, closer to Elizabethan than modern British English. That, however, is another topic.

With regard to accents, trust me, I know. I live in Charlotte, North Carolina. As in, the south. I grew up in the South. When I am in Chicago with my British friends, they often have to speak for me in order that we be understood by the Chicagoans. Even so, as southern accents go, mine is surpassingly mild.

absentee

regional accent from growing up in Appalachia before TV was common. You know what "outsiders" ask him? "Are you from the Old Country?"

When my team lead talks of possible risks that may or may not happen in the future, he says, "We'll just have to burn that bridge when we come to it."

-
NARF

... although, not from ignorance.

absentee

A few days ago a car salesman said to us that something "would be a blessing in the sky." Now that's a great homophone. I think there was a book called "Pullet Surprise" about all the great homophones kids come up with (because of course, they hear phonetically).

A very common homophone here is it's/its. All of them drive me batty and I am no longer able to take the post seriously when I stumble upon them. (I'm one of those who reads all work emails and communications with a mental red pen and categorizes the writer accordingly. Yeah, I need to chill, but I can't respect professionals who can't write.) Don't even get me started on the illiteracy of journalists and the typos in newly published books; I could write a book. I can't believe there are editors anymore.

This is not stupidity; this is the American education system at work. When I worked briefly in an alternative learning program, I discovered just how poorly educated our own teachers are. They cannot write. How can they possibly teach it?

I had grate English teachers, something I'll always be greatful for. ;-)

You may not be interested in war, but war is interested in you.

upbringing notwithstanding, I manage to write, if not speak, in fair to middlin' English. Out of economic self-preservation, so as to get the one course he needed to graduate done, I "helped" my oldest write a paper for his one remaining college class. The first sad commentary on current state university education is the fact that I scanned the text, did some Google work, wrote the thing over a weekend, and he got an A. The second and more telling sad commentary is that he after reading it was concerned that the professor might not believe he wrote it, so he "edited" it and filled it with all sorts of modern punk kid patois, truly bad grammar in places, dropped all sorts of transitions; I could go on. Had one of my subordinates given something to me written like that, it would have come back looking like I'd slit my wrists over it! He got an A for it.

In Vino Veritas

The text? My "fingernails-on-blackboards" comes with the frequent variation on "with Johnnie and I,"or, when they think that might be wrong, they change it to "with me and Johnnie."

I sighted this mixup in an e-mail a few minutes ago at an unexpected site:

I'll be leaving my work sight in another hour and will return on tomorrow.

Since the writer is not on military duty, I replied thusly:

If you're going to be leaving your "work sight" soon, that means that you're one step ahead of the rest of us - in that you can still see your work (rather than having it buried under piles of...don't ask!)

And Rightly So!

I guess that's better than returning "off" tomorrow!

It's war -- so when can we start shooting back at the enemy Democrats?

another reason to beware of those assumptions you don't think to question - they're the toughest to catch.

And Rightly So!

it is still standard English (I believe) to use the masculine pronoun in cases when gender is unknown or both...

"Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
Ronald Reagan

I didn't repost this, don't know how it came to the top.


absentee

It deserves to be hear at the top. You should of anticipated it.

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

for I have to go fishing soon, and have no other place for the worms.

___________________________________
Two thirds of the world is covered by water,
the other third is covered by Champ Bailey.

______________________________________
Proud member of the Barry Goldwater wing of the party !

It's such a fine line between stupid and clever. - David St. Hubbins

I see my reference earlier made you bring this back! I'm pretty sure I recommended it the first time, I think I will recommend it again! I feel just like a Democrat!

I wouldn't be able to change the posting date on a blog entry. I think someone was messing with Neil by putting it back to the top.

absentee

And I'm laughing like crazy, heh.

HTML Help Central for Red Staters
Let's nominate the Nash Equilibrium for President.

Moe, for he more than anyone else 'round here, loves throwing the little barbs into the left.

___________________________________
Two thirds of the world is covered by water,
the other third is covered by Champ Bailey.

It's obvious and very widespread proof that millions of Americans have been victimized by substandard education, including some otherwise bright people who have just been left weak in this department through no real fault of their own. As you said, now we see such errors more frequently in mass media, so it gets reinforced. There should be no further doubt that American education needs something besides money to cure its ills.

lesterblog.blogspot.com

is improper use of apostrophe's. Its extremely annoying.

Not far behind, is improper use, of comma's.

When the only tool you own is a hammer, every problem begins to resemble a nail. -- Abraham Maslow

Punctuation errors also invite as much confusion as these other problems do.

The best illustration is the sentence below. Try adding commas and see how the meaning is greatly changed:

The teacher said Johnny is a fool.

HTML Help Central for Red Staters
Let's nominate the Nash Equilibrium for President.

Although I am not sure if this qualifies as a homophone:

"The terrorist are a-comin' to git us"

Terrorists, for crying out loud. TERRORISTS, with an "S" on the end! What part of PLURAL do you not get?

having discovered terrorist several times in my pages when I was SURE I had typed terrorists, I blame it on MS Word. I KNOW that idiot program has changed my words, thinking it is smarter than I!

That is my story and I am sticking with it!

English is her 2nd language.

Carlos: "What? Were they [Democrats]?"
Seth: "They look like [Democrats]? Is that what they looked like? They were vampires.
"[Democrats] do not explode when sunlight hits them."

Re: "free rein" or "free rein"

The Free Dictionary lists them both as acceptable spellings of the same idiom.

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/give+free+rein
http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/give+free+reign

Yet another website gives numerous examples from published sources which suggest that "free reign is entering mainstream usage."

http://eggcorns.lascribe.net/english/34/reign/

On a broader level, I understand your concerns. On the other hand, it is important to urge grammatical correctness without becoming pedantic or dogmatic.

A precedent embalms a principle.
- Disraeli

"Just as in habiliments it is a sign of weakness to wish to make oneself noticeable by some peculiar and unaccustomed fashion, so, in language, the quest for new-fangled phrases and little-known words comes from a puerile and pedantic ambition."
-Michel de Montaigne, "Of the Education of Children" [Essays], 1580

Certainly I don't intend to come off so seriously as to be characterized as dogmatic. I wrote this with a degree of humor about the situation. However, an endless stream of neologisms resulting from defeated acceptance of broad misuse seems hardly a desirable alternative to the occasional cantankerous outburst, I think.

Then again, perhaps I am being hypercritical. All in good fun, though, and I mean that.

Good research, by the way. I guess I'll tolerate "free reign".

absentee

and performs a valuable role. I favour it. I believe Shakespeare did too.

Quentin Langley
Editor of http://www.quentinlangley.net

International Editor of

... your blog post with a homophone? I was about to point out your use of the word "Their" to start the first sentence, but then I thought it could have been intentional irony.

A precedent embalms a principle.
- Disraeli

"Their is a malady, a contagious infection if you will, that is making the rounds hear at Redstate. In fact, not just hear, but in the news tickers on cable news networks, in advertising, and even in newspaper headlines. As you've surely surmised, I'm talking, of course, about homophones. Specifically, I'm talking about using the wrong one from a group of them. I've been doing so throughout this paragraph. (I'm going to try to stop now, as it is tiresome.)"

More than one, just to make the point.

absentee

 
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