Hannity should stop plugging Quinn

By Samsara Posted in Comments (1) / Email this page » / Leave a comment »

Sean Hannity has consistently said that he likes John McCain personally and respects his service to our country. I believe him. He disagrees with McCain on issues. That’s fine, so do I. But why is he promoting the Pittsburgh based “Quinn and Rose In The Morning” radio show? Is Sean unaware that Quinn used his show to spread rumors accusing McCain of being a traitor?

On Tuesday, February 5, 2008, Jim Quinn read on the air an unsubstantiated internet article alleging that POW John McCain "accommodated" his captors and was rewarded with an apartment in Hanoi. Quinn then directed his listeners to go online and read the part of the article he said was too "inflammatory" for the air. The article reported that McCain was provided prostitutes at this hotel room. Quinn then gave out the web address of this trash. He urged his listeners to read this article because the author was a source he respected.

I am reluctantly providing the address of the article. Its garbage, but its part of my story.

http://www.tothepointnews.com/content/view/3068/2/

Rose Tennant, the Rose half of the Quinn and Rose duo, is scheduled is be on “Hannity and Colmes” again soon, perhaps even tonight. During her last appearance on April 9th, Sean plugged Quinn’s radio show, giving out it’s name and where viewers could tune in. Rose was not on the air the day that Quinn decided to spread these shameful lies, so I hope she gets on Fox as often as she can. My question is: does Sean know what kind of show he is endorsing? I know he doesn’t advocate this kind of trash, so I hope he stops plugging Quinn.

I wish every right-leaning talk show host would simply drop any mention of WND because I've seen so much yellow journalism, plagiarism and advertisements for conspiracy theory books there.

lesterblog.blogspot.com

 
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